Raw.

RAWOPENING2.jpg
 

We all go through different phases in life.

So we asked our supporters to share their life experiences with us

as our knitwear goes through life with them. 

 

There is a comfortable place where each of us finds in knitwear.

We have wanted to share its place as well as something very sensual and beautiful that we find in them.

It is a raw voice of them that transcends knitwear or fashion.

 

The images here are taken at different times of a day and hardly retouched. 

We did not use a fancy camera to create the fancy photographs. 

 

Here are the very raw moments of them and their voices that are straight from who they are.

We could bring something back to our own communities with all your support. 

So thank you. 

 

Hope you find their spoken and unspoken words here with us. 

 
 DAYNA   Digital Archivist      T.E.  You have been involved in fashion and fashion photography for years now with your background of  B.A. in English literature and an M.S. in library science.   How did fashion become a part of you?  What do you most like about timeless garments and knitwear?   D.O.   I can remember enjoying dressing myself and observing fashion with pleasure, but now that archiving photography is my job, leaving no time to read or to knit, I really can't recall why.  When Tomo and I were modeling together, there was so much time to sit and knit, to read or to talk, to be in ones own brain, to think, to imagine.  If I had the leisure time to knit lately, I suppose I'd have something to say about fashion.  Making garments with my hands might have been what made me interested in it, but, confined to involvement in the digital realm, now I can't get past the consumerism to enjoy anything about the design.       T.E.  How did you learn how to knit? What you do love about handkniting and knitwear?   D.O  I taught myself to knit from a book when I was in high school, but I knit the most when we were working together.   I like to knit gifts for other people, personal things that can't be bought. And I like to learn a new technique with every piece I make.  My own tastes in knitwear, for what I wear myself, are too minimal to be appealing to me to hand knit--much more along the lines of Tomo's. Big shapes, solid colors, perfect details, good drape.    

DAYNA 

Digital Archivist 

 

T.E.

You have been involved in fashion and fashion photography for years now with your background of  B.A. in English literature and an M.S. in library science. 

How did fashion become a part of you?  What do you most like about timeless garments and knitwear? 

D.O. 

I can remember enjoying dressing myself and observing fashion with pleasure, but now that archiving photography is my job, leaving no time to read or to knit, I really can't recall why.  When Tomo and I were modeling together, there was so much time to sit and knit, to read or to talk, to be in ones own brain, to think, to imagine.  If I had the leisure time to knit lately, I suppose I'd have something to say about fashion.  Making garments with my hands might have been what made me interested in it, but, confined to involvement in the digital realm, now I can't get past the consumerism to enjoy anything about the design.  

 

T.E.

How did you learn how to knit? What you do love about handkniting and knitwear? 

D.O

I taught myself to knit from a book when I was in high school, but I knit the most when we were working together. 

I like to knit gifts for other people, personal things that can't be bought. And I like to learn a new technique with every piece I make.  My own tastes in knitwear, for what I wear myself, are too minimal to be appealing to me to hand knit--much more along the lines of Tomo's. Big shapes, solid colors, perfect details, good drape. 

 

 LAUREN JIN   Designer - The founder of CLE Cosmetics      T.E.  You have shared the art of white with us and your customers, could you share that again with all of us here?  L.J.  I chose white, because once, my mother told me that if I am ever creatively stuck, I should stare at a white wall.  The reason is because, naturally, the color white allows our mind to fill it. By staring at the white wall long enough, your mind creates in order to fill in the white.  I thought that made complete sense and whenever I creatively struggled, I would always stare at a designated white wall.  Hence, my use of white for CLE. Our brand ethos is about  modern women , who are in control, who can think for themselves. I realized there was no need to really choose a color for the CLE girl, as she simply would fill in the white herself.     T.E.  Why do you love knitwear? Where do you go to wearing your cashmere pieces from us?   L.J.  I love knitwear because of its fluidity. The material itself allows the wearer to move, to stretch, to do whatever. I think that kind of freedom in movement is so beautiful.  I take my knit shawl with me whenever I travel of course or when I want to just add a bit of coziness to my wardrobe. Again, the shawl itself is so flexible in terms of function, that I am able to simply use it as a blanket, as a pillow, as a source of warmth. But I think it is also this feeling of comfort that the shawl has for me. Tightness of knit against my body always gives me a source of comfort. So whenever I pull the shawl around me, I feel safe.   

LAUREN JIN 

Designer - The founder of CLE Cosmetics 

 

T.E.

You have shared the art of white with us and your customers, could you share that again with all of us here?

L.J.

I chose white, because once, my mother told me that if I am ever creatively stuck, I should stare at a white wall.

The reason is because, naturally, the color white allows our mind to fill it. By staring at the white wall long enough, your mind creates in order to fill in the white.

I thought that made complete sense and whenever I creatively struggled, I would always stare at a designated white wall.

Hence, my use of white for CLE. Our brand ethos is about modern women, who are in control, who can think for themselves. I realized there was no need to really choose a color for the CLE girl, as she simply would fill in the white herself.

 

T.E.

Why do you love knitwear? Where do you go to wearing your cashmere pieces from us? 

L.J.

I love knitwear because of its fluidity. The material itself allows the wearer to move, to stretch, to do whatever. I think that kind of freedom in movement is so beautiful.

I take my knit shawl with me whenever I travel of course or when I want to just add a bit of coziness to my wardrobe. Again, the shawl itself is so flexible in terms of function, that I am able to simply use it as a blanket, as a pillow, as a source of warmth. But I think it is also this feeling of comfort that the shawl has for me. Tightness of knit against my body always gives me a source of comfort. So whenever I pull the shawl around me, I feel safe.

 

 
 MARGOT MORIN   Writer - Brand consultant - Yogi      T.E.  Growing up in Paris, what did you see as a child? What did you dream to become?  M.M.   Growing up in Paris, I saw a lot of differences: different people, different looks, and different voices. My dream was to become a either a singer, dancer or the first female president of France. I’m neither of them, but each part of all these functions is in everything I do today.      T.E.  You worked for couture high-end fashion houses for a long time in Pairs. What did you learn most in the environment? How did it help to create who you are today?   M.M.  I learned how to “ship”. In this industry, people have crazy ideas that actually need to exist on the catwalk. Even if it’s hard or sometime seems impossible, it has to be done and it has to be done on time. This definitely helped me to create what I am today. You can have the best idea in the world. Unless you don’t work and work and work and work, it stays just an idea.     T.E.  Why do you choose to purchase and wear cashmere regulary?   M.M.  Because cashmere is the “comfort food” to my closet.   

MARGOT MORIN 

Writer - Brand consultant - Yogi 

 

T.E.

Growing up in Paris, what did you see as a child? What did you dream to become?

M.M. 

Growing up in Paris, I saw a lot of differences: different people, different looks, and different voices. My dream was to become a either a singer, dancer or the first female president of France. I’m neither of them, but each part of all these functions is in everything I do today. 

 

T.E.

You worked for couture high-end fashion houses for a long time in Pairs. What did you learn most in the environment? How did it help to create who you are today? 

M.M.  I learned how to “ship”. In this industry, people have crazy ideas that actually need to exist on the catwalk. Even if it’s hard or sometime seems impossible, it has to be done and it has to be done on time. This definitely helped me to create what I am today. You can have the best idea in the world. Unless you don’t work and work and work and work, it stays just an idea.

 

T.E.

Why do you choose to purchase and wear cashmere regulary? 

M.M.

Because cashmere is the “comfort food” to my closet.

 

 
 ASHLEY PARISH   Men's designer at Life After Denim      T.E.   You sometimes play Jazz music at home out of the Jazz record collection from your grandfather. Any memories with your grandmother? What did you learn most from them growing up?   A.P.  It feels good to put a record on sometimes. My grandpa's collection was eclectic and he had everything from Isaac Hayes to Simon & Garfunkel. When we listened to jazz together I would watch his fingers dance instinctively, keeping time and never missing a beat. His soul survives in that music and I've learned through his life and passing that sharing this legacy with the next generation is important.  Only now do I appreciate how inspiring my grandmother was for having a career, especially as a woman of color. For years she worked alongside my grandfather at Hughes Aircraft and together they achieved the "American Dream," giving my dad immeasurable opportunities that would one day trickle down to my brother and I.       T.E.   Tomomi's simple idea was to create quality cashmere knitwear that is affordable to herself and her friend so that it leads to any generations. Now we are trying to bring back to our communities through The Loop Project. You are in this project. How does your knitwear from us play a part in your life? Or how does it make you feel everyday?   A.P.  Living in Los Angeles, where the weather report rarely strays from sunny, I celebrate mornings crisp enough to pull out my cashmere by Tomomi. The act of wearing it comforts me in a way that is hard to describe. Simply put, it just feels good. Everyday activities like grabbing coffee are made luxurious and I'm reminded to take time and care in all that I do.       

ASHLEY PARISH 

Men's designer at Life After Denim 

 

T.E. 

You sometimes play Jazz music at home out of the Jazz record collection from your grandfather. Any memories with your grandmother? What did you learn most from them growing up? 

A.P.

It feels good to put a record on sometimes. My grandpa's collection was eclectic and he had everything from Isaac Hayes to Simon & Garfunkel. When we listened to jazz together I would watch his fingers dance instinctively, keeping time and never missing a beat. His soul survives in that music and I've learned through his life and passing that sharing this legacy with the next generation is important.

Only now do I appreciate how inspiring my grandmother was for having a career, especially as a woman of color. For years she worked alongside my grandfather at Hughes Aircraft and together they achieved the "American Dream," giving my dad immeasurable opportunities that would one day trickle down to my brother and I.  

 

T.E. 

Tomomi's simple idea was to create quality cashmere knitwear that is affordable to herself and her friend so that it leads to any generations. Now we are trying to bring back to our communities through The Loop Project. You are in this project. How does your knitwear from us play a part in your life? Or how does it make you feel everyday? 

A.P.

Living in Los Angeles, where the weather report rarely strays from sunny, I celebrate mornings crisp enough to pull out my cashmere by Tomomi. The act of wearing it comforts me in a way that is hard to describe. Simply put, it just feels good. Everyday activities like grabbing coffee are made luxurious and I'm reminded to take time and care in all that I do. 

 

 

 
 MIRA GRACER  Psychiatrist      T.E.  What made you want to be a doctor? You knew at an early age that you would have to go to a medical school for many years to become one.  What is your daily routine like and what makes you feel most fulfilled or happy at work?   M.G.  I knew that wanted to help people. At the same time I've always been fascinated by hearing people's stories- to me, Psychiatry is the perfect blend between medicine and story telling.       T.E.  You told us about your grandmother as a successful knitwear designer from the 70's, and we got to see her stunning work. How did you like being around her or how did she influence you growing up?   M.G.   Some of my earliest memories are playing dress up among the fabrics scraps in my grandma's knitwear factory.  Her work is so bright and whimsical, and so totally her. It's inspired me to challenge conventions and be more creative in my own life.       T.E.   How do you like your cashmere products from us?   M.G.   Obviously the knits are completely stunning- but beyond that, it's really important to me that the things I buy reflect my values... Tomo's commitment to giving back to local communities make me feel warm inside and out.    

MIRA GRACER

Psychiatrist 

 

T.E.

What made you want to be a doctor? You knew at an early age that you would have to go to a medical school for many years to become one.  What is your daily routine like and what makes you feel most fulfilled or happy at work? 

M.G.

I knew that wanted to help people. At the same time I've always been fascinated by hearing people's stories- to me, Psychiatry is the perfect blend between medicine and story telling.  

 

T.E.

You told us about your grandmother as a successful knitwear designer from the 70's, and we got to see her stunning work. How did you like being around her or how did she influence you growing up? 

M.G. 

Some of my earliest memories are playing dress up among the fabrics scraps in my grandma's knitwear factory.  Her work is so bright and whimsical, and so totally her. It's inspired me to challenge conventions and be more creative in my own life.  

 

T.E. 

How do you like your cashmere products from us? 

M.G. 

Obviously the knits are completely stunning- but beyond that, it's really important to me that the things I buy reflect my values... Tomo's commitment to giving back to local communities make me feel warm inside and out. 

 

 
 TITANIA INGLIS  Designer at Titania Inglis     T.E.  You recently became a mother. What is the quality of being a mother? And what have you learned so far as a mother?   T.I.  What strikes me most is the tenderness of the physical and emotional bond I've formed with my baby. In his first few days of life, I was moved almost to tears over how tiny and vulnerable and beautiful he was; as he gets older, I cherish his luminous smiles and his touch. The main lesson I've learned in motherhood is to plan several steps ahead, since I'm often holding him and have no hands to spare; the thing I'm still trying to learn is infinite patience.     T.E.  You recently hand painted on fingerless gloves that you made with us. Including your handpainted pieces, what do you have in mind while painting on garments?   T.I  In my textile paintings, I strive to reflect the organic beauty o the natural world; it took me years to realize I was incorporating Chinese painting techniques learned in childhood. In contrast to patternmaking, the paintings are a way of relinquishing control, by developing a technique for a particular fabric and letting that guide the outcome.     T.E.   What is your greatest hope for your own child and future children as a mother and fashion designer?   T.I.  He will have a generous spirit, and maintain his sense of wonder. And that he will always know he is loved.   

TITANIA INGLIS

Designer at Titania Inglis

 

T.E.

You recently became a mother. What is the quality of being a mother? And what have you learned so far as a mother? 

T.I.

What strikes me most is the tenderness of the physical and emotional bond I've formed with my baby. In his first few days of life, I was moved almost to tears over how tiny and vulnerable and beautiful he was; as he gets older, I cherish his luminous smiles and his touch. The main lesson I've learned in motherhood is to plan several steps ahead, since I'm often holding him and have no hands to spare; the thing I'm still trying to learn is infinite patience.

 

T.E.

You recently hand painted on fingerless gloves that you made with us. Including your handpainted pieces, what do you have in mind while painting on garments? 

T.I

In my textile paintings, I strive to reflect the organic beauty o the natural world; it took me years to realize I was incorporating Chinese painting techniques learned in childhood. In contrast to patternmaking, the paintings are a way of relinquishing control, by developing a technique for a particular fabric and letting that guide the outcome.

 

T.E. 

What is your greatest hope for your own child and future children as a mother and fashion designer? 

T.I.

He will have a generous spirit, and maintain his sense of wonder. And that he will always know he is loved.